Mike Slinn
Mike Slinn

jekyll_plugin_support

Published 2023-02-12. Last modified 2024-01-03.
Time to read: 9 minutes.

This page is part of the jekyll_plugins collection.

After writing over two dozen Jekyll plugins, I distilled the common code into jekyll_plugin_support. This Ruby gem facilitates writing and testing Jekyll plugins and handles the standard housekeeping that every Jekyll tag and block plugin requires. Logging, parsing arguments, obtaining references to site and page objects, etc. are all handled. The result is faster Jekyll plugin writing with fewer bugs.

Jekyll_plugin_support can be used to create simple Jekyll plugins in the _plugins/ directory of your Jekyll project or gem-based Jekyll plugins.

At present, only Jekyll tags and blocks are supported.

Plugins that use jekyll_plugin_support include:

... and also the demonstration plugins in jekyll_plugin_support

Features

Jekyll plugin tags created from jekyll_plugin_support framework automatically have the following features:

  1. Boilerplate is removed, so you can focus on the required logic and output.
  2. Arguments are parsed for keywords and name/value parameters.
  3. Single or double quotes can be used for arguments and parameters; quotes can be omitted for single-token arguments.
  4. Important variables are defined
  5. Error handling is standardized, and includes an automatically defined error type and corresponding CSS tag for each Jekyll tag.
  6. Jekyll and Liquid variables are evaluated when passed as tag parameters, and used in the body of block tags.
  7. Plugin registration is integrated, and important configuration details are reported during registration.
  8. A custom logger is created for each tag, independent of the default Jekyll logger.
  9. Variables can be defined in _config.yml, and optionally have different values for debug mode, production mode and test mode.
  10. An attribution message is available.
  11. Draft pages are automatically detected.
  12. A demonstration website is provided for easy testing of your plugins.
  13. Visual Studio Code debugging is set up for the plugin code and the demo website.
  14. Nugem can create working scaffolding for new plugins built using jekyll_plugin_support.

Installation

Jekyll_plugin_support is packaged as a Ruby gem. If your custom plugin will reside in a Jekyll project’s _plugins directory, add the following line to your Jekyll plugin’s Gemfile.

Shell
group :jekyll_plugins do
  ... 
  gem 'jekyll_plugin_support', '>= 0.8.0'
  ...
end 

Otherwise, if your custom plugin will be packaged into a gem, add the following to your plugin’s .gemspec:

Shell
Gem::Specification.new do |spec|
  ... 
  spec.add_dependency 'jekyll_plugin_support', '>= 0.8.0'
  ...
end 

Install the jekyll_plugin_support gem in the usual manner:

Shell
$ bundle

Copy the CSS classes from demo/assets/css/jekyll_plugin_support.css to your Jekyll project’s CSS file.

About

JekyllSupport::JekyllBlock and JekyllSupport::JekyllTag provide support for Jekyll tag block plugins and Jekyll inline tag plugins, respectively. They are very similar in construction and usage.

Instead of subclassing your custom Jekyll block tag class from Liquid::Block, subclass from JekyllSupport::JekyllBlock. Similarly, instead of subclassing your custom Jekyll tag class from Liquid::Tag, subclass from JekyllSupport::JekyllTag.

Both JekyllSupport classes instantiate new instances of PluginMetaLogger (called @logger) and JekyllPluginHelper (called @helper).

JekyllPluginHelper defines a generic initialize method, and your tag or block tag class should not need to override it. Also, your tag or block tag class should not define a method called render because jekyll_plugin_support defines one.

Instead, define a method called render_impl. For inline tags, render_impl does not accept any parameters. For block tags, a single parameter is required, which contains text passed from your block in the page.

Your implementation of render_impl can parse parameters passed to the tag / block tag, as described in Tag Parameter Parsing.

General Usage

Please see the demo/ project for a well-documented set of demonstration Jekyll plugins that are built from jekyll_plugin_support. Additional information is available here and the jekyll_plugin_support GitHub project.

JekyllSupport::JekyllBlock and JekyllSupport::JekyllTag provide support for Jekyll block tags and Jekyll inline tags, respectively. They are similar in construction and usage.

Instead of subclassing your Jekyll block tag class from Liquid::Block, subclass from JekyllSupport::JekyllBlock instead.

Likewise, instead of subclassing your Jekyll inline tag class from Liquid::Tag, subclass from JekyllSupport::JekyllTag instead.

Both JekyllSupport classes instantiate new instances of PluginMetaLogger (called @logger) and JekyllPluginHelper (called @helper).

Inline and Block Tag Plugin Implementation

Both JekyllSupport classes define a generic initialize method, and your inline tag or block tag class should not override it.

Also, your inline tag or block tag class should not define a method called render, because both JekyllSupport classes define this method.

Instead, define a method called render_impl. For inline tags, render_impl does not accept any parameters. For block tags, a single parameter is required, which contains any text enclosed within your block.

Predefined Plugin Variables

Jekyll_plugin_support defines the following Ruby variables that you can use in your plugin’s render_impl method:

Argument Parsing

Tag arguments can be obtained within render_impl. Both keyword options and name/value parameters are supported.

Both JekyllTag and JekyllBlock use the standard Ruby mechanism for parsing command-line options: shellwords and key_value_parser.

All your code has to do is specify the keywords to search for in the string passed from the HTML page that your tag is embedded in. The included demo website has examples; both demo/_plugins/demo_inline_tag.rb and demo/_plugins/demo_block_tag.rb contain the following:

Shell
@keyword1  = @helper.parameter_specified? 'keyword1'
@keyword2  = @helper.parameter_specified? 'keyword2'
@name1     = @helper.parameter_specified? 'name1'
@name2     = @helper.parameter_specified? 'name2'

If an argument has a variable reference in it, the value of the variable is substituted for the reference. For example, given:

  • _layouts/default.html defines a variable called var_layout in its front matter.
  • index.html defines a variable called var_page in its front matter.
  • index.html assigns a variable called x via the liquid assign statement.

... then the following references in a page will be substituted for their values in arguments and in block tag bodies:

Shell
{% my_block_tag
  param1="x={{x}}"
  param2="var_page={{page.var_page}}"
  param3="var_layout={{layout.var_layout}}"
%}

Assigned variables do not need a namespace: x={{x}}

Page variables must be qualified with the 'page' namespace:
  var_page={{page.var_page}}

Layout variables must be qualified with the 'layout' namespace:
  var_layout={{layout.var_layout}}
{% endmy_block_tag %}

You can see similar code in demo/demo_inline_tag.html.

The page['excerpt'] and page['output'] key/value pairs are removed from processing because of recursion issues. You cannot look up those values from a jekyll_plugin_support plugin.

Keyword Options

For all keyword options, values specified in the document may be provided. If a value is not provided, the value true is assumed. Otherwise, if a value is provided, it must be wrapped in single or double quotes.

Examples

The following examples use the die_if_error keyword option for the pre and exec tags from the jekyll_pre plugin.

Specifying Tag Option Values

The following sets die_if_error true:

Implicitly enabling die_if_error
{% pre die_if_error %} ... {% endpre %}

The above is the same as writing:

Explicitly enabling die_if_error
{% pre die_if_error='true' %} ... {% endpre %}

Or writing:

Explicitly enabling die_if_error
{% pre die_if_error="true" %} ... {% endpre %}

Neglecting to provide surrounding quotes around the provided value causes the parser to not recognize the option. Instead, what you had intended to be the keyword/value pair will be parsed as part of the command. For the pre tag, this means the erroneous string becomes part of the label value, unless label is explicitly specified. For the exec tag, this means the erroneous string becomes part of the command to execute. The following demonstrates the error.

Pre: missing quotes around the value of die_if_error
{% pre die_if_error=false %} ... {% endpre %}

The above causes the label to be die_if_error=false.

Exec: missing quotes around the value of die_if_error
{% exec die_if_error=false ls %} ... {% endpre %}

The above causes the command to be executed to be die_if_error=false ls instead of ls.

Quoting

Parameter values can be quoted.

If the value consists of only one token, then quoting is optional. The following name/value parameters all have the same result:

  • pay_tuesday="true"
  • pay_tuesday='true'
  • pay_tuesday=true
  • pay_tuesday

If the values consist of more than one token, quotes must be used. The following examples both yield the same result:

  • pay_tuesday="maybe not"
  • pay_tuesday='maybe not'

Remaining Markup

After your plugin has parsed all the keyword options and name/value parameters, call @helper.remaining_markup to obtain the remaining markup that was passed to your plugin.

Configuration Variables

jekyll_plugin_support provides support for Liquid variables to be defined in _config.yml, in a section called liquid_vars. These variables behave exactly like Liquid variables defined by assign and capture expressions, except they are global in scope; these variables are available in every Jekyll web page.

The following _config.yml fragment defines 3 configuration variables called var1, var2 and var3:

_config.yml fragment
liquid_vars:
  var1: value1
  var2: 'value 2'
  var3: value3

Liquid variables defined in this manner are intended to be embedded in web pages. They are can be used like any other Liquid variable.

Variable Expansion

Jekyll expands Liquid variable references during the page rendering process. Jekyll does not expand Liquid variable references passes as parameters to tag and block plugins, however. However, plugins made from jekyll_plugin_support automatically expand variable references passed as parameters and in block tag bodies.

Jekyll_plugin_support tag and block plugins expand the following types of variables:

  • Jekyll_plugin_support configuration variables, discussed above.
  • Jekyll page and layout variables.
  • Inline Liquid variables (defined in assign and capture statements).

In the following example web page, Jekyll expands the var1 reference within the <p> tag, but not the var1 or var2 references passed to my_plugin.

Fragment of Jekyll web page
---
---
<p>This is the value of var1: {{var1}}.</p>

{% my_plugin param1="{{var1}}" param2="{{var2}}" %}

Assuming that my_plugin was written as a jekyll_plugin_support plugin, all variable references in its parameters are expanded. Thus, the above is interpreted as follows when my_plugin is evaluated during the Jekyll rendering process:

Intermediate Fragment
<p>This is the value of var1: value1.</p>

{% my_plugin param1="value1" param2="value 2" %}

Jekyll_plugin_support expands all but one of the plugin variables described above, replacing Liquid variable references with their values. The exception is @argument_string, which is not expanded.

Liquid Variable Values Specific To Production, Development and Test Modes

jekyll_plugin_support allows Liquid variables defined in _config.yml to have different values when Jekyll is running in development, production and test modes. When injecting variables into your Jekyll website, Jekyll_plugin_support refers to definitions specific to the current environment and then refers to other definitions that are not overridden.

Here is an example:

Shell
liquid_vars:
  development:
    var1: 'http://localhost:4444/demo_block_tag.html'
    var2: 'http://localhost:4444/demo_inline_tag.html'
  production:
    var1: 'https://github.com/django/django/blob/3.1.7'
    var2: 'https://github.com/django-oscar/django-oscar/blob/3.0.2'
  var3: 'https://github.com/mslinn'

For the above, the following variable values are set in development mode:

  • var1 http://localhost:4444/demo_block_tag.html
  • var2 http://localhost:4444/demo_inline_tag.html
  • var3 https://github.com/mslinn

... and the following variable values are set in production and test modes:

  • var1 https://github.com/django/django/blob/3.1.7
  • var2 https://github.com/django-oscar/django-oscar/blob/3.0.2
  • var3 https://github.com/mslinn

Liquid Variables in jekyll_plugin_support Subclasses

You can define additional Liquid variables in plugins built using jekyll_plugin_support. To achieve this, make entries in _config.yml under a key named after the value of @tag_name.

For example, let’s imagine you create a plugin using jekyll_plugin_support, and you register it with the name phonetic_alphabet. You could define Liquid variables that would be made available to content pages in web applications that incorporate the phonetic_alphabet plugin. The following section in _config.yml defines variables called x, y and z, with values xray, yankee and zulu, respectively:

phonetic_alphabet:
  x: xray
  y: yankee
  z: zulu

The above definitions allow you to write content pages that use those variables, like the following:

---
layout: default
title: Variable demo
---
The letter x is pronounced {{x}}.
Similarly, the letters y and z are pronounced {{y}} and {{z}}.

... which expands to:

Variable demo
The letter x is pronounced xray.
Similarly, the letters y and z are pronounced yankee and zulu.

Automatically Created Error Classes

JekyllSupport::JekyllBlock and JekyllSupport::JekyllTag subclasses automatically create error classes, named after the subclass.

For example, if you create a JekyllSupport::JekyllBlock subclass called DemoBlockTag, the automatically generated error class will be called DemoBlockTagError.

Although you could use it as you would any other error class, JekyllPluginSupport provides some helper methods. These methods fill in the page path and line number that caused the error, shorten the stack trace, log an error message, and can be used to return an HTML-friendly version of the message to the web page.

The following example is a shortened version of demo/_plugins/demo_block_tag.rb. You might want to write similar code in your rescue blocks.

demo/_plugins/demo_block_tag.rb
class DemoBlock < JekyllSupport::JekyllBlock
  VERSION = '0.1.2'.freeze

  def render_impl(text)
    raise DemoBlockTagError, 'Fall down, go boom.'
  rescue DemoBlockTagError => e
    e.shorten_backtrace
    @logger.error e.logger_message
    raise e if @die_on_demo_block_error

    e.html_message
  end
end

Error class methods have been provided for standardized and convenient error handling:

  • shorten_backtrace - most of the lines that spew from a Jekyll backtrace are uninteresting and unhelpful.
  • logger_message - The message is constructed from the string provided when the error was raised, with the page path and line number added.
  • html_message - The same as logger_message, but constructed with HTML.

Self-Reporting Upon Registration

When each tag is registered, it self-reports, for example:

Jekyll startup messages
INFO PluginMetaLogger: Loaded plugin demo_inline_tag v0.1.2. It has:
  Error class: DemoTagError
  CSS class for error messages: demo_tag_error

  _config.yml contains the following configuration for this plugin:
    {"die_on_demo_tag_error"=>false, "die_on_standard_error"=>false}


INFO PluginMetaLogger: Loaded plugin demo_inline_tag_no_arg v0.1.0. It has:
  Error class: DemoTagNoArgsError
  CSS class for error messages: demo_tag_no_args_error

  _config.yml does not contain configuration information for this plugin.
  You could add a section containing default values by specifying a section for the tag name,
  and an entry whose name starts with `die_on_`, followed by a snake_case version of the error name.

    demo_inline_tag_no_arg:
      die_on_demo_tag_no_args_error: false

Writing Plugins

The following minimal examples define VERSION, which is important because JekyllPluginHelper.register logs that value when registering the plugin.

This is how you would define plugins in the _plugins directory:

Boilerplate for an inline tag plugin
require 'jekyll_plugin_support'

module Jekyll
  class DemoTag < JekyllSupport::JekyllTag
    VERSION = '0.1.0'.freeze

    def render_impl
      @helper.gem_file __FILE__ # Enables attribution; only works when plugin is a gem
      # Your Jekyll plugin logic goes here
    end

    JekyllPluginHelper.register(self, 'demo_tag')
  end
end
Boilerplate for a tag block plugin
require 'jekyll_plugin_support'

module Jekyll
  class DemoBlock < JekyllSupport::JekyllBlock
    VERSION = '0.1.0'.freeze

    def render_impl(text)
      @helper.gem_file __FILE__ # Enables attribution; only works when plugin is a gem
      # Your Jekyll plugin logic goes here
    end

    JekyllPluginHelper.register(self, 'demo_block')
  end
end

If your plugin is packaged as a gem, then you might need to include version.rb into the plugin class. For example, if your version module looks like this:

module MyPluginVersion
  VERSION = '0.5.0'.freeze
end

Then your plugin can incorporate the VERSION constant into your plugin like this:

Shell
require 'jekyll_plugin_support'
require_relative 'my_plugin/version'

module Jekyll
  class MyBlock < JekyllSupport::JekyllBlock
    include MyPluginVersion

    def render_impl(text)
      @helper.gem_file __FILE__ # Enables attribution; only works when plugin is a gem
      # Your code here
    end

    JekyllPluginHelper.register(self, 'demo_block')
  end
end

No_arg_parsing Optimization

If your tag or block plugin only needs access to the raw arguments passed from the web page without tokenization, and you expect that the plugin might be invoked with large amounts of text, derive your plugin from JekyllBlockNoArgParsing or JekyllTagNoArgParsing. See the demo plugins for an example.

This feature is used by the select tag in the jekyll_pre plugin.

Subclass Attribution

JekyllTag and JekyllBlock subclasses of jekyll_plugin_support can utilize the attribution option if they are published as gems. Jekyll­Tag­No­Arg­Parsing and Jekyll­Block­No­Arg­Parsing subclasses cannot. This feature is usually only desired for JekyllBlock subclasses.

  • When used as a keyword option, a default value is used for the attribution string.
  • When used as a name/value option, the attribution string can be specified.

Using the attribution option causes subclasses to replace their usual output with HTML that looks like:

Shell
<div id="jps_attribute_12345" class="jps_attribute">
  <a href="https://github.com/mslinn/jekyll_outline">
    <b>Generated by <code>jekyll_outline</code>.
  </a>
</div>

The id attribute in the sample HTML above is randomized, so more than one attribution can appear on a page.

Attribution Generation

You can decide where you want the attribution string for your Jekyll tag to appear by invoking @helper.attribute. For example, this is how the jekyll_outline tag generates output:

portion of render_impl in jekyll_outline
<<~HEREDOC
  <div class="outer_posts">
  #{make_entries(collection)&.join("\n")}
  </div>
  #{@helper.attribute if @helper.attribution}
HEREDOC

Usage

Typical usage for the attribution tag is:

Shell
{% my_block_tag attribution %}
  Content of my_block_tag.
{% endmy_block_tag %}

The normal processing of my_tag is augmented by interpolating the attribution format string, which is a Ruby-compatible interpolated string.

The default attribution format string is:

Shell
"Generated by the #{name} #{version} Jekyll plugin, written by #{author} #{date}."

Because jekyll_plugin_suppprt subclasses are gems, their gemfiles define values for name, version, homepage, and authors, as well as many other properties. The date property is obtained from the plugin/gem publishing date.

An alternative attribution string can be specified using any of the above properties:

Shell
{% my_tag attribution="Generated by the #{name} #{version} Jekyll plugin, written by #{author} #{date}" %}

Development

After checking out the jekyll_plugin_suppprt repository, run bin/setup to install dependencies.

bin/console provides an interactive prompt that allows you to experiment.

To build and install this gem on your local machine, run:

Shell
$ bundle exec rake install
jekyll_plugin_support 0.1.0 built to pkg/jekyll_plugin_support-0.1.0.gem.
jekyll_plugin_support (0.1.0) installed. 

Examine the newly built gem:

Shell
$ gem info jekyll_plugin_support

*** LOCAL GEMS ***
jekyll_plugin_support (0.1.0) Author: Mike Slinn Homepage: https://github.com/mslinn/jekyll_plugin_support License: MIT Installed at: /home/mslinn/.gems
Provides a framework for writing and testing Jekyll plugins.

Pry Breakpoint On StandardError

A pry breakpoint will be set in the StandardError handler if pry_on_standard_error: true is set in the Liquid variable definition section for your plugin within _config.yml.

For example, if your plugin is called blah, enable the breakpoint with the following section:

Shell
blah:
  pry_on_standard_error: true

Demonstration Plugins and Website

The jekyll_plugin_support GitHub project includes a demo website. It can be used to debug the plugin or to run it freely.

Examining the Demo Plugins

The following example plugins use Ruby’s squiggly heredoc operator (<<~). The squiggly heredoc operator removes the outermost indentation. This provides easy-to-read multiline text literals.

require 'jekyll_plugin_support'

module Jekyll
  # DemoTagError = JekyllSupport.define_error

  class DemoTag < JekyllSupport::JekyllTag
    VERSION = '0.1.2'.freeze

    def render_impl
      @demo_tag_error = @helper.parameter_specified? 'raise_demo_tag_error'
      @keyword1       = @helper.parameter_specified? 'keyword1'
      @keyword2       = @helper.parameter_specified? 'keyword2'
      @name1          = @helper.parameter_specified? 'name1'
      @name2          = @helper.parameter_specified? 'name2'
      @standard_error = @helper.parameter_specified? 'raise_standard_error'

      if @tag_config
        @die_on_demo_tag_error = @tag_config['die_on_demo_tag_error'] == true
        @die_on_standard_error = @tag_config['die_on_standard_error'] == true
      end

      raise DemoInlineTagError, 'Fall down, go boom.' if @demo_tag_error

      _infinity = 1 / 0 if @standard_error

      output
    rescue DemoInlineTagError => e # jekyll_plugin_support handles StandardError
      e.shorten_backtrace
      @logger.error e.logger_message
      raise e if @die_on_demo_tag_error

      e.html_message
    end

    private

    def output
      <<~END_OUTPUT
        <pre># jekyll_plugin_support becomes able to perform variable substitution after this variable is defined.
        # The value could be updated at a later stage, but no need to add that complexity unless there is a use case.
        @argument_string="#{@argument_string}"

        @helper.argv=
          #{@helper.argv&.join("\n  ")}

        # Liquid variable name/value pairs
        @helper.params=
          #{@helper.params&.map { |k, v| "#{k}=#{v}" }&.join("\n  ")}

        # The keys_values property serves no purpose any more, consider it deprecated
        @helper.keys_values=
          #{(@helper.keys_values&.map { |k, v| "#{k}=#{v}" })&.join("\n  ")}

        @layout='#{@layout}'
        @page.keys='#{@page.keys}'

        remaining_markup='#{@helper.remaining_markup}'

        @keyword1='#{@keyword1}'
        @keyword2='#{@keyword2}'
        @name1='#{@name1}'
        @name2='#{@name2}'</pre>
      END_OUTPUT
    end

    JekyllPluginHelper.register(self, 'demo_inline_tag')
  end
end

require 'cgi'
require 'jekyll_plugin_support'

module Jekyll
  # DemoBlockError = JekyllSupport.define_error

  class DemoBlock < JekyllSupport::JekyllBlock
    VERSION = '0.1.2'.freeze

    def render_impl(text)
      @demo_block_error = @helper.parameter_specified? 'raise_demo_block_error'
      @keyword1         = @helper.parameter_specified? 'keyword1'
      @keyword2         = @helper.parameter_specified? 'keyword2'
      @name1            = @helper.parameter_specified? 'name1'
      @name2            = @helper.parameter_specified? 'name2'
      @standard_error   = @helper.parameter_specified? 'raise_standard_error'

      if @tag_config
        @die_on_demo_block_error = @tag_config['die_on_demo_block_error'] == true
        @die_on_standard_error   = @tag_config['die_on_standard_error'] == true
      end

      raise DemoBlockTagError, 'Fall down, go boom.' if @demo_block_error

      _infinity = 1 / 0 if @standard_error

      output text
    rescue DemoBlockTagError => e # jekyll_plugin_support handles StandardError
      e.shorten_backtrace
      @logger.error e.logger_message
      raise e if @die_on_demo_block_error

      e.html_message
    end

    private

    def output(text)
      <<~END_OUTPUT
        <pre>@helper.tag_name=#{@helper.tag_name}

        @mode=#{@mode}

        # jekyll_plugin_support becomes able to perform variable substitution after this variable is defined.
        # The value could be updated at a later stage, but no need to add that complexity unless there is a use case.
        @argument_string="#{@argument_string}"

        @helper.argv=
          #{@helper.argv&.join("\n  ")}

        # Liquid variable name/value pairs
        @helper.params=
          #{@helper.params&.map { |k, v| "#{k}=#{v}" }&.join("\n  ")}

        # The keys_values property serves no purpose any more, consider it deprecated
        @helper.keys_values=
          #{(@helper.keys_values&.map { |k, v| "#{k}=#{v}" })&.join("\n  ")}

        @helper.remaining_markup='#{@helper.remaining_markup}'

        @envs=#{@envs.keys.sort.join(', ')}

        @config['url']='#{@config['url']}'

        @site.collection_names=#{@site.collection_names&.sort&.join(', ')}

        @page['description']=#{@page['description']}

        @page['path']=#{@page['path']}

        @keyword1=#{@keyword1}

        @keyword2=#{@keyword2}

        @name1=#{@name1}

        @name2=#{@name2}

        text=#{text}</pre>
      END_OUTPUT
    end

    JekyllPluginHelper.register(self, 'demo_block_tag')
  end
end

The following is an example of no_arg_parsing optimization.

require 'jekyll_plugin_support'

module Jekyll
  class DemoTagNoArgs < JekyllSupport::JekyllTagNoArgParsing
    VERSION = '0.1.0'.freeze

    def render_impl
      <<~END_OUTPUT
        The raw arguments passed to this <code>DemoTagNoArgs</code> instance are:<br>
        <code>#{@argument_string}</code>
      END_OUTPUT
    end

    JekyllPluginHelper.register(self, 'demo_inline_tag_no_arg')
  end
end

Run Freely

  1. Run from the command line:
    Shell
    $ demo/_bin/debug -r
  2. View the generated website, which might be at http://localhost:4444, depending on how you configured it.

Plugin Debugging

  1. Set breakpoints in Visual Studio Code.
  2. Initiate a debug session from the command line by running the demo/_bin/debug script:
    Shell
    $ demo/_bin/debug
    Fetching gem metadata from https://rubygems.org/..........
    Resolving dependencies...
    Fetching public_suffix 5.0.4
    Fetching nokogiri 1.15.5 (x86_64-linux)
    Installing public_suffix 5.0.4
    Installing nokogiri 1.15.5 (x86_64-linux)
    Bundle complete! 17 Gemfile dependencies, 96 gems now installed.
    Use `bundle info [gemname]` to see where a bundled gem is installed.
     INFO PluginMetaLogger: Loaded DraftFilter plugin.
    INFO PluginMetaLogger: Loaded outline_js v1.2.1 plugin.
    INFO PluginMetaLogger: Loaded outline v1.2.1 plugin.
    Configuration file: /mnt/f/jekyll_plugin_support/demo/_config.yml
              Cleaner: Removing /mnt/f/jekyll_plugin_support/demo/_site...
              Cleaner: Removing /mnt/f/jekyll_plugin_support/demo/.jekyll-metadata...
              Cleaner: Removing /mnt/f/jekyll_plugin_support/demo/.jekyll-cache...
              Cleaner: Nothing to do for .sass-cache.
    DEBUGGER: Debugger can attach via TCP/IP (127.0.0.1:37177)
    DEBUGGER: wait for debugger connection...
  3. Once the DEBUGGER: wait for debugger connection... message appears, run the Visual Studio Code launch configuration called Attach with rdbg.
  4. View the generated website, which might be at http://localhost:4444, depending on how you configured it.


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